Small Balcony, Huge Garden – FineGardening


Today we’re off to Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, to visit Wema Mojar’s beautiful balcony garden.

Wema has transformed her tiny balcony space into a beautiful and productive garden. If you think you can’t have a garden because you don’t have the space, this post will prove you wrong!

ornamental and edible plants on a balconyOne corner of the balcony is packed with plants both beautiful and edible. Wema has certainly created a much more beautiful sight than just a view of a parking lot!

bright green container planting on a balconyOne great way to make the most out of a small space is to go UP. Lifting this container up multiplies the space available to grow things. And I love the yellow creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’, Zones 3–9) tumbling over the edge.

lots of greenery on a balconyLooking down a bit really shows how Wema has created a wall of greenery. And to make this space do even more work, Wema has mixed in edibles with the ornamentals. I see a pepper plant and a tomato plant growing along with the beautiful foliage and flowers.

edible plants growing in containersStrawberries, beans, peppers, bunches of greens, carrots—and it looks like squash all growing happily! Ornamental sweet potato vines (Ipomoea batatas, Zones 9–11 or as annuals) are tucked in as well to add some color.

tomatoes growing on a balconyAnd in the back is a towering planting of tomatoes! Wema has really turned this balcony into a little jungle of greenery.

million bells plantAnd one final shot of a flowery balcony resident includes a cheerful million bells (Calebrachoa hybrid, annual), with a few tomato leaves sneaking their way into the picture.

 

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